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Allison Transmission demolishes Tasmanian company’s need for manual shifting

Allison-equipped Hino 500 Series truck

Demolition fleet replaces an aging manual hook lift skip truck with a new Allison-equipped Hino 500 Series to retain a valued driver and for safety and efficiency gains

HOBART, Tasmania
Facing the potential loss of one of its most valued and productive employees who was contemplating retirement, Reardon Demolition purchased a new fully automatic Allison transmission-equipped Hino because of the ease of operating the new truck.

“Even I have to get behind the wheel from time to time and I really enjoy driving the automatic,” said Charles Kingston, operations manager for Reardon. “It is terrific in stop-start traffic. The old manual was very tiring, constantly changing gears all day.”

Based in the Tasmanian state capital of Hobart, Reardon Demolition is one of the leading demolition companies on the island state, operating a fleet of trucks and demolition machinery. The family-owned company services the construction industry, local councils, state and federal government departments and the general business sector providing commercial and domestic demolition along with civil excavations and associated works.

“Many think because it’s a small city, Hobart is not that busy – but it has its share of traffic jams and hold ups – so the Allison Automatic just makes life easier,” said Kingston. “It is a really good truck and the automatic is a boon for us, it has helped us keep our driver who was getting sick and tired of having to change gears in the old manual truck and was contemplating retirement.”

The new Allison-equipped truck is used to drop off and pick up skip bins at demolition and construction sites around Hobart and most of Tasmania. Kingston said the automatic Hino has enabled the company to not just keep a valued driver but has also meant safer maneuvering and more efficient operations both on road and on demolition sites.

‘We have found the new auto is more precise and easier to back up to a skip without hesitation on site while the torque converter automatic is better in slippery conditions where it has better traction and drivability,” said Kingston. “Another really great aspect is the way the automatic works in downhill situations where you can hold a gear and it helps slow the vehicle surprisingly well in Hobart’s hilly terrain, I don’t think we would go back to a manual ever again.”

The criteria for the new machine was pretty straightforward, it had to be a medium duty 4x2 with steel spring suspension with a hydraulic Power Take-Off (PTO) and an automatic transmission. The Reardon Hino FG1628 Medium Long Auto was among the first of the new model Hinos to be sold in Australia and has been climbing the hills and traversing the suburbs of Hobart since April without fault.

“It is important that we have the best machinery and in that regard the Allison-equipped truck is a valuable asset to our fleet,” said Kingston. “We do the right thing and always have the right equipment and having the new automatic Hino is part of that philosophy, it is the right truck for the job, properly spec’d and right for the task.”

Jan 12, 2018

About Allison Transmission

Allison Transmission (NYSE: ALSN) is the world’s largest manufacturer of fully automatic transmissions for medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicles and is a leader in electric hybrid-propulsion systems for city buses. Allison transmissions are used in a variety of applications including refuse, construction, fire, distribution, bus, motorhomes, defense and energy. Founded in 1915, the company is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA and employs approximately 2,900 people worldwide. With a market presence in more than 80 countries, Allison has regional headquarters in the Netherlands, China and Brazil with manufacturing facilities in the U.S., Hungary and India. Allison also has approximately 1,400 independent distributor and dealer locations worldwide. For more information, visit allisontransmission.com.